Panasonic HDTV

The high-definition television (HDTV) market has become very competitive lately. Manufacturers have been striving to introduce new features that will sway consumers to buy their televisions. Panasonic is regarded as an innovator in the HDTYV market, leading the way with new features that were unimaginable just a few years ago. Along the way, it has won many awards for its Viera range of plasma and LCD televisions. A Panasonic HDTV is certainly more expensive than some of the other brands but that is insignificance when compared with its superior features.

Viera is the brand name used for every Panasonic HDTV, whether it be a plasma or an LCD model. There are many models in the Viera range, most of which are identified by short code numbers which are easy to remember. Panasonic added the first 3D models to the Viera range shortly after the release of Avatar, the box-office smash hit that was the first movie to use the new technology. The Viera range includes large models that are ideal for a home theater, medium models that would suit a lounge room, and small models for a study or bedroom.

The quality of the display is what makes or breaks a HDTV. It is no good having a large screen if the resolution is so low that the picture lacks detail. Choosing a Panasonic HDTV, or any HDTV for that matter, requires careful thought about the screen size, viewing distance, and the resolution. There are both standard and full high definition models in the Viera range. While the difference may not be very noticeable on a small screen, it becomes more apparent as the size of the screen increases.

Most Panasonic HDTV models have advanced display features that improve the picture quality but not every model has the same features. THX certification ensures that the picture quality meets the highest standards for clarity and color accuracy. The SubField Drive reducing blurring by boosting the frame rate and smoothing out the picture. This is great for sports broadcasts and action movies when there is a lot of movement on the screen. Of course, it is also important to choose a model that has a high brightness and contrast, low refresh time, and a wide viewing angle.

Several Panasonic HDTV models support Viera Cast, which is an innovative feature that bridges the gap between television and the internet. It avoids the need to connect a television to a computer, allowing selected websites to be viewed as if they were regular channels by pressing a few buttons on the remote control. Some of the things you can do with Viera Cast include watching videos on YouTube, viewing picture on Picassa, and reading news on Bloomberg. In the future, more websites are sure to be added to the service.

Viera Link is another innovative feature that is available on selected models. It allows the remote control to operate most of the other equipment in a home entertainment system, provided that they are connected with HDMI cables. When the Viera Link button is pressed, a menu appears on the television that guides the user through the options available. Some of the things that can be done with Viera Link include adjusting the volume on the surround sound system, playing a movie on a Blu-ray/DVD player, playing videos from a camcorder, and showing pictures from a digital camera.

Other features to look for when choosing a Panasonic HDTV are Viera Image Viewer and Viera Tools. A television that has Viera Image Viewer can display photos stored on a memory card. When the card is inserted into a slot on the side, the photos appear on the screen and can be navigated with the remote control. Viera Tools is a user-interface which displays icons across the bottom of the screen. Some of the newest Panasonic HDTV models can use the Skype internet service, which allows video calls to be made with the television. Panasonic also make a range of HDTV accessories, such as wall mounts, surge protectors, and HDMI cables.

This Panasonic HDTV Review is Written/Updated on Jan 13th, 2011 and filed under Consumer Electronics. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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