HP Netbook

A netbook is more powerful than a mobile phone and easier to carry than a notebook. It is an ideal computer to have on business trips, especially when you need to type something in a hurry. A netbook can also be used to browse websites but the small display and touchpad makes this a bit awkward. Netbooks are very affordable compared to other computers, with most costing under $500. Along with many other manufacturers, Hewlett Packard (HP) has entered the netbook market with their affordable Mini range. You can buy a small Mini for as little as $280, but there is also a larger Mini that is nearly as big as a notebook.

A netbook is basically a smaller and simpler version of a notebook computer. It has less processing power and fewer features but is lighter and easier to carry around. A netbook fits easily into a carry bag or brief case and takes up much less space than a notebook. Netbooks are also made by other computer manufacturers like Acer, Asus, MSI, Samsung, and Toshiba. There are many new brands coming out of China and India which are incredibly cheap, but these are sold mostly through internet sites. While the popularity of tablet computers is growing fast, their lack of a physical keyboard is a big reason why many people choose a netbook.

Hewlett Packard is a name that should be familiar to anyone who works with personal computers. The company has been making computers and peripherals since the early days of the industry. In that time, they have gained a reputation for quality and good service that few other manufacturers can match. The current models in the HP netbook range are the Mini 110, Mini 210, and the Mini 311. They are all powered by an Intel Atom processor, which is both powerful and energy efficient. The Minis come preinstalled with either Windows XP Home or Windows 7 Starter, depending on which one you choose. Of course, there are several differences between the three models so it pays to look closely at the specifications before choosing one.

The Mini 110 is currently the smallest and lightest HP netbook available, measuring only 10.5 by 7.6 inches and weighing just 2.7 pounds. It has an LCD display that measures 10.1 inch diagonally. Reading fine text is difficult on any screen of that size, but an external display can be used by plugging it into the VGA output port. The Intel Atom processor is supported by up to 2GB of RAM memory, along with a hard drive of up to 250GB capacity. The Mini 110 comes with Wi-Fi capability but Bluetooth is an optional extra. A three-cell battery lasts for about three hours but you can get a six-cell battery that lasts for double that time. The Mini 110 costs just $280, making it one of the cheapest netbooks available.

The Mini 311 is a larger and heavier model than the Mini 110, measuring 11.4 by 8 inches and weighing 3.3 pounds. The display measures 11.6 inches diagonally, which is a full inch larger than the display on the Mini 110. The Mini 311 also has an Intel Atom processor supported by up to 3GB or RAM memory. You can choose either a hard drive of up to 320GB capacity or go with a solid state drive of up to 80GB capacity. The keyboard is nearly full size and feels just like a notebook keyboard. The Mini 311 also has Wi-Fi and optional Bluetooth. At a retail price of $400, it is more expensive than the Mini 110 but still good value compared to other netbooks.

There are plenty of accessories that you should look at getting along with your HP netbook. A spare AC adapter and battery are always to have when traveling. Like most netbooks, the Minis do not have an optical drive, but you can get an external DVD writer for one. When the tiny built-in speakers are not loud enough, a pair of earphones or external speakers comes in handy. A VGA cable is needed to hook up a HP netbook to an external monitor, and a USB port replicator provides extra Ethernet, audio, or USB ports. To protect your HP netbook from scratches, use one of the many stylish sleeves available.

This HP Netbook Review is Written/Updated on Nov 20th, 2010 and filed under Computer Hardware. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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