Ergonomic Keyboard

If you are a sufferer of wrist pain, you could have carpal tunnel. Symptoms include aching, burning, numbness or tingling of your palm, fingers, thumb or wrist. People who use repeated motions at the computer are at risk for this ailment, and if you are one of the afflicted you should consider an ergonomic keyboard. The right ergonomic keyboard can actually reduce, even cure, carpal tunnel symptoms.

An ergonomic keyboard is designed so that your hands and wrist rest more naturally on the device, so as to be more comfortable, less awkward and prevent pain or injury. For people who spend most of their time on a keyboard, the ergonomic keyboard is essential to reduce pain and injury. Read on to learn about the best models out there.

There are various features that separate an ergonomic keyboard from a typical keyboard. Many offer height adjustments, angle adjustments and in the most extreme cases, the keyboard can actually break into two or three pieces. In addition, the amount of force needed to push down the keys is also taken into consideration.

Just like athletic shoes, if you go for the cheapest, you will be hurting. You get what you pay for and you don’t want to be cheap when it comes to your health. In fact, you are better served testing out the keyboards at a tech shop before ordering one because different things work for different people. For example, many consider the Microsoft Natural to be a godsend, but there is a distinct piece of the population that curses its space bar. For some, having the keyboard straight makes them feel confined, whereas others don’t notice.

If you can get past the unusual appearance of some of these ergonomic keyboards, you could be well on your way to comfort and ergonomic health. The following are considered the best ergonomic keyboards out there:

  • The Microsoft Natural Ergonmuic Desktop 7000 is designed for a more natural hand, wrist and forearm movement. This is a wireless device, and the mouse fits “like a handshake.” It works right out of the box and is compatible with Windows XP, Vista and more. You will need a USB port, working CD drive and 60 MB of free space. Other notable Microsoft models include the Sidewinder X6 and the Natural Ergonomic 4000.
  • The Logitech Cordless Desktop Wave is another winner in the ergonomic keyboard department for its ease to get used ti and its affordability.
  • The Goldtouch features adjustable settings, a goof value, a soft tactile feel and low key noise. You can angle it flat or up or use it straight. There are adjustments for wrist splay and wrist pronation as well and had comfortable mouse positioning.
  • The Comfort Keyboard System looks like something Batman would use with its three adjustable sections, programmable keys and adjustability at all lengths and angles. You can put the numeric pad anywhere you like and you can program macro keys for characters that you type repeatedly.
  • The Kinesis Freestyle Solo Keyboard totally separates into two parts, has a sleek design with quiet keys that don’t require much force and there are embedded 10-keys for those who use the number pad often.
  • The Pace Keyboard looks like something the Jetsons would use, but has an adjustable, split keyboard, a numeric keypad to the right and soft keys. Dual spacebar and an extra backspace key contribute to its design made for comfort.
  • The ErgoMagic Keyboard has 4 adjustable settings and programmable keys. Three sections can be separated to up to 6 inches apart and adjusted to angles of up to 45 degrees.
This Ergonomic Keyboard Review is Written/Updated on Sep 21st, 2009 and filed under Computer Hardware. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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