Color Printer

There are now two types of color printers on the market – color inkjet printers and color laser printers. While both types can produce high quality prints and even crisp photographic printing, there are some differences that you should be aware of when in the market to purchase a new color printer.

Color inkjet printers have been around for over two decades but they basically work the same as they always have. They produce images (text and pictures) by putting tiny dots of color on the paper in the precise pattern needed to reproduce the image. These dots range in size but the finest prints come from the smallest dots. These dots are measured in dpi or dots per inch. The higher the dpi, the more precise and sharp the results.

Inkjet printers are much less expensive than the laser printers are, partly because the technology has been around for so long and partly because the materials used in laser printing are more costly. You can buy a low end color inkjet printer for less than $50 however you will sacrifice both speed and quality by sticking only to the lowest priced models. Higher end color inkjet printers are similar in price to low end color laser printers so you need to find a balance between the speed and quality you require and the budget you can afford.

Color laser printers offer much faster print speeds than ink jet printers. It’s text is crisper text, it’s graphics sharp. They are the ideal choice for business use.

Color laser printers are the choice for office use, even if you don’t need color. Currently, they become cheaper enough to be the printer of choice for any office. However, if you are planning to print pictures, their limited quality is still inferior to dedicated photo printing.

There are color lasers for personal and for shared use. However, even small single function printers are too big to put it on your desk. Don’t buy a personal printer if you are working with a team. Personal means not small, but simple, not to be connected in a network.

Graphics in all cases is excellent for all internal business use. In most cases, it is suitable for marketing materials like brochures or mailers. It’s photo quality can be from barely acceptable to almost true photo quality. If you need to print photos, go for a dedicated model, developed specially for this purpose.

Depending on the duty – light or heavy – choose a color printer that can handle it. Beware about speed specifications. Mostly manufactures only mean the black-and-white speed, the printer speed is much slower for color printing.

The paper capacity can be a nightmare for team-work. Some color printers have only a capacity of 150 sheets. That means constant refilling the cartridge in most cases. Many manufactures guarantee a duty cycle of 200,000 pages per month. With other printers, you can expect to have to repair it from a extreme low range of only a couple of thousands pages per month.

Most color lasers are faster than the fastest desktop ink jet printer. Small and home office simply need that. Even the slowest color laser is better than an ink jet printer. The speed advantage is worth the investment.

And last but not least, color cartridges can be expensive. Check how much a new cartridge costs. Most manufactures offer you a well-priced device with expensive cartridges. That’s only an advantage for you if you only print a couple of pages per month. If you need to print everyday in color, the cost of the color cartridge could be huge.

This Color Printer Review is Written/Updated on Aug 1st, 2009 and filed under Computer Hardware. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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