Brother MFC Printer

Brother is a Japanese company that has been in existence for just over one hundred years. The company started out making sewing machines and still makes them today, but it’s better known for its wide range of office equipment, which includes typewriters, computer printers, photocopiers, fax machines, and label printers. Brother is a respected name in the computer printer business and competes with the likes of Canon, Hewlett-Packard, and Lexmark. There are many different models in the Brother MFC printer range, which makes it easy to find one that has the right features and price.

A Brother MFC printer is also known as a multi-function center. This type of computer printer has a scanner built into the top that allows it to work like a photocopier. The more expensive models also have the ability to send and receive faxes. It’s a very popular type of printer because it removes the need to have several different machines taking up space on a desktop. Canon sell this type of printer in their Pixma range and Hewlett Packard brand them as All-In-One printers. There are three types of Brother MFC printer available, each one using a different kind of printer technology.

The most affordable type is the color inkjet, with models starting at $130 and going as high as $700. There are many different color inkjets to chose from, but they are only suitable for low volume printing. For high volume printing, a laser printer is the only sensible option. Toner cartridges cost more than inkjet cartridges but can print many more pages. This reduces the cost per page and makes a laser printer the best choice for printing invoices and newsletters. The mono laser models are priced between $300 and $1100, and the color laser models are priced between $800 and $1600.

The important features of the printer are the resolution and printing speeds. For color inkjet and color laser models, there will be a speed for mono pages and a speed for color pages. When looking for a new printer, choose one that has high values for both of these features. Generally, resolution is more important that speed for color inkjet models because they are used to print letters, artwork, and photographs. On the other hand, speed is more important that resolution for laser models because they are used to print lots of simple pages very quickly.

Every Brother MFC printer has a scanner for making copies of documents. It’s also used for sending faxes in models with that capability. As for the printer, the resolution and speed of the scanner should be as high as possible. One of the great advantages of this type of printer is that it can be used as a standalone copier and fax, without being connected to a computer. Most of the scanners are flatbeds, which means that documents are laid flat on a sheet of glass, just like an office copier. But there are also a few models that have a sheet feeder instead of a flatbed, and they work in much the same way as a normal fax machine.

The great thing about a Brother MFC printer is that it removes the need to have a separate printer and copier. Having one machine do the job of two frees up space on the desktop, plus it reduces power usage and maintenance costs. Some of the more expensive models can also be used as a fax machine, so even that can be taken off the desktop and put into storage. The fax should have a fast transmission speed and should be able to hold a large number of incoming pages in its memory, so that they can be reviewed later and deleted if necessary.

The number of extra features that a Brother MFC printer has depends on its price. They may include wireless connectivity, LCD touchscreen controls, automatic sheet feeder, digital answering machine, or direct photo printing. Wireless connectivity can take the form of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or both. A few of the models with fax capability even come with a telephone handset. Many of these extra features are not apparent from the outside, so check the list of specifications to see if they are included before buying.

This Brother MFC Printer Review is Written/Updated on Feb 12th, 2011 and filed under Computer Hardware. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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